From The Constitution, Wednesday, April 9, 1862 (volume 25, number 1267)

Latest News

No battle has been fought during the week, and the news has not been exciting. But military movements indicate that we are on the eve of not only one but of two great and probably decisive battles. The army of McClellan is in the immediate neighborhood of the enemy. On Saturday, a dispatch from Fortress Monroe states that cannonading had been heard in the direction of Yorktown all that morning. Stirring news from that quarter may be received at any hour.

From the west, we learn that Beauregard is concentrating a large force at Corinth. He is believed to have from 75,000 to 80,000 men there. The advance of Gen. Buell’s army had formed a junction with Gen. Grant’s on the Tennessee opposite Savanna. It is thought the united forces of Buell and Grant are superior to the enemy in numbers and in artillery. Those best informed say there must be a battle this week.

We learn from Burnside’s army that extensive preparations for the siege of Fort Macon were in progress, and already several shells had been thrown into the works.

On Friday night the gunboat Carondelet succeeded in running past the rebel batteries at Island No. 10 and joined Gen. Pope’s forces. She is now in a position to shell out the rebel batteries on the opposite side of the river, and aid Gen. Pope in sending across a portion of his command.

Last Wednesday, 2000 of Gen. Butler’s forces landed at Biloxi, Miss., and severed the telegraphic communications between New Orleans and Mobile.

The news from Port Royal is not important.

A Fortress Monroe boat to Baltimore brings information from the neighborhood of Yorktown to Saturday afternoon. Shipping Point had been taken by our troops and other places on the route formerly occupied by the rebels.

Some skirmishing and cannonading had taken place between the outposts of the enemy and our forces.

Gradual Emancipation

On Wednesday the Senate passed the House resolution introduced in accordance with the recommendation of the President’s emancipation message. It passed by the decisive vote of 32 to 10, and has become a law. So that now the aid of the General Government is proffered to such states as may desire to adopt the plan of gradual emancipation. The enactment of this law is the first step taken by the administration to show to the world that its influence is to be on the side of freedom, and that the reign of cotton and slavery in this country is over. Henceforth slavery is section, freedom is national.

Emancipation in the District of Columbia

The Senate passed the bill emancipating the slaves in the District of Columbia on Thursday by a large majority. According to this bill emancipation is to be immediate ; owners are to receive compensation and an appropriation is made for colonizing the negroes who shall be made free.

Many are now living who distinctly recollect the uproar which was occasioned in Washington, when John Quincy Adams, Ex-President of the United States and then a member of the House of Representatives, presented a petition for the abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia. It was the first instance of the kind, and created an excitement such as has hardly been known since. The “old man eloquent” was brought to the bar of the House to answer for daring to present such an unheard of petition. He has long since passed to the grave, but the cause which he was the first man to advocate, has not received the sanction of the Senate and is about to triumph in the House.

Loyalty and Slavery

The democratic party during the state canvass just closed, urged but one argument against the Unionists. The latter were charged with being abolitionists, and this was the only charge made against them. It was rather small capital to go into the campaign with, but it was all the democracy had, and they made the most of it. The style in which the charge was made was perfectly characteristic of that party. Without using any discrimination whatever, without telling what they meant by the term they used, they classed all those as abolitionists who joined in supporting the government in this war. Edward Everett was of the same abolition stripe as Wendell Phillips. Gov. Sprague was all one in sentiment with Wm. Lloyd Garrison. A charge made in this loose and blind way loses all force, and nobody was in the least frightened or hurt by it.

Many years ago the term “abolitionist” was used in an offensive sense. It designated one who, without regard to the constitution and the laws, was ready to aid in the liberation of slaves, and who desired [sic] allegiance to the constitution because it was construed to permit slavery. In those days, Garrison and Phillips were the representative men of abolitionism. They were avowed disunionists. These men have never shown any attachment to the government nor to their country. They have only hated slavery and everything connected with it. Abolitionists of this intense kind have never been numerous in the country, and have never acquired any political power.

The sentiment which now prevails among the great mass of the northern people in relation to slavery is entirely remote from the above. The basis on which the republican party stands, and on which all union men stand, is loyalty to the government. It is fundamental with them that the government must and shall be preserved. This is the first article in their political creed. It follows, as a natural consequence, that they will oppose and put down whatever threatens the integrity, or the existence of the government. Slavery has armed itself against the government. It has endeavored to break up the Union. It has refused all allegiance to the constitution. The loyal men of the north have, therefore, become the most decided enemies of this institution, and they have no hesitation in saying that they mean to place it where it will never again trouble the country. Its political power must be crushed. The moral sentiment of christian communities and freemen now joins with the all-powerful loyalty of the northern heart in pronouncing the doom of a system which has been the bane and curse of the country for more than thirty years.

The man who to-day is pro-slavery in sentiment and action is an enemy of the government. Any one who would give slavery its old position, who would permit it to exhibit all its former power and influence at the national capital, would subscribe to a dissolution of the Union. No loyal man can strike hands with the system which has aimed a blow at the vitals of the nation. He can no more do it than Washington could have restored the traitor Benedict Arnold to the command of West Point. The nature and tendency of the system are now fully unfolded. Its political aims are comprehended. The people and the “institution” understand each other perfectly, and it is impossible that it should be restored to its former position.

CONNECTICUT ALL RIGHT !!

A Victory for the Union !

Nearly 10,000 for Buckingham

The news received this morning shows that Connecticut is a true and loyal state. Her majority for Buckingham is from 7,000 to 10,000. Every Senatorial district but two has been heard from, and every one of these has elected a Union man. The House of Representatives will have an overwhelming Union majority. The victory in Connecticut is as decisive as that at Fort Donelson. In this County the two Senatorial Districts have done nobly, electing Union men by good majorities.

The Election

The election in this town was closely contested. Every thing available was brought out by the democrats, and they made a hard fight of it. They were sure that if they could carry any town in the State they ought to carry Middletown, the old “stronghold.” But they were defeated, notwithstanding the fact that many of the Union men, we are sorry to say, staid at home. The whole of the Union ticket is elected. We have a majority of 64 on representatives, and 89 on Governor. Below is the

Vote of Middletown

Representatives.

Union.

Dist. 1st.

2d.

3d.

4th.

Bartlett Bent, Jr.,

249

325

82

75

Benj. W. Coe,

235

327

81

74

Democratic
Charles C. Hubbard,

245

333

57

36

David Savage,

232

328

57

36

Avery Caswell 2, Ste’n Brooks 1, M. Culver 1.

State Officers.

Union.

Dist. 1st.

2d.

3d.

4th.

Buckingham,

242

347

83

74

Averill,

230

310

83

75

Trumbull,

253

349

83

75

Coite,

227

290

83

75

Cutler,

253

351

83

75

Dem.
Loomis,

242

322

57

36

Pond,

249

327

57

36

Stevens,

249

328

56

36

Kingsbury,

245

326

55

36

Taylor,

240

323

56

36

Seat. 35 on Lieut. Governor.

Last year the democratic majority on Governor in this town was 251, and on representatives 284. The whole number of votes polled last year was 1654, while this spring the vote was 1402, or 252 less. Buckingham then received 716 votes, he this year receives 746. Loomis then had 967, this year but 657, a falling off of more than three hundred.

The whole of the Union ticket of Justices was elected. The following is the list:

Benjamin Douglas. Thomas Atkins.
Moses Culver. Gabriel W. Coite.
Waldo P. Vinal. William H. Willard.
Charles C. Tyler. Warren Prior.
Samuel L. Warner. Chester Hentz.
Elihu W. N. Starr. Samuel C. Hubbard.
Andrew A. Cody. Stephen Brooks.
Arthur B. Calef. Henry Smith.
Stephen B. Davis. Joseph Gleason.
Norman L. Brainerd. Walter W. Wilcox.
Horace Clark. John Barry.
James O. Smith. Leonard Burrows.
Daniel H. Birdsey. Lewis L. Kelsey.
Augustus Putnam. William T. Elmer.
Horace D. Hall. George W. Burke.
Nelson Coe. Arthur W. Bacon.

_________________________

18th Senatorial District.

Leach Ransom
Middletown, 746 655
Durham, 135 65
Cromwell, 9 maj.
Chatham, 175 136
Portland, 195 314

Leach’s majority 72.

Middletown Probate District

Vinal Smith
Middletown, 680 660
Cromwell, 137 135
Durham, 136 62
953 857

Vinal’s majority 96.

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Body Found – Probable Murder

On Tuesday last the body of a man was discovered floating in the river at the mouth of the creek. It was so much disfigured by the action of the water, for it had evidently been in the river a long time, that it was at first difficult to recognize it. But by the help of the clothing and some other marks, it was identified as the body of John McCarthy, of this city, who had been missing for eight or ten weeks past. A jury of inquest was called by Justice Lathrop, and an examination of the body was made by Dr. Bell, who stated that there were indications of violence having been received, and he appeared to have been wounded on the head. The verdict of the jury was that deceased came to his death by violence, inflected by some person or persons unknown. McCarthy was about 30 years of age, a tailor by trade, and had been in the employ of William J. Gilbert. He disappeared mysteriously, and some investigation was made at the time, as there was suspicion of foul play, but nothing came out and the matter was dropped. It is now made probable that he was murdered, and his body placed under the ice in the river.

Sudden Death

We last week stated that a young man had just been found dead that morning (Tuesday) in the street in Portland. His name was Robert Murphy, and his age was 18. He had previously enlisted for three years, but had received a discharge on account of poor health. His complaint was disease of the heart. On his return he went to work for Mr. Sylvester C. Dunham on his farm which borders on the river in Maromas. Mr. Dunham had purchased a pair of cattle in the east part of Portland or in a town adjoining, and on Monday, Murphy went over to drive them home. In the course of the day the cattle returned alone to the place whence they started, and as nothing was seen or heard of Murphy some anxiety was naturally felt. The next morning the man who had sold the animals to Mr. Dunham started off on horseback to see what was the matter. He had not proceeded far when he found the body of Murphy. When discovered he was in a sitting posture, on the bank of a small brook, and still held the cart-whip in his hand. He was quite dead. Evidently, it was an attack of his old complaint, and he probably died without a struggle and almost instantaneously.

_________________________

Rev. Nathan Bangs, formerly President of the Wesleyan University, is lying sick at his residence in New York, and is not expected to recover.

The New York Boats

On Wednesday morning between seven and eight o’clock, the steamer City of Hartford came along side her dock in this city, on her first trip from New York. She looked like a new boat entirely, one we had never seen on this river before. Her identity, however, was clearly proved and the spectators were satisfied by the fact that Capt. Simpson, hearty and good humored as ever, trod the hurricane deck, and Mr. Parker in his blandest manner presided at the gangway. The public will welcome them and the other officers of the City on their old route. Some important improvements have been made on this boat. A new promenade deck has been built over the bow, and fourteen new state rooms have been added. The pilot house is raised to the upper deck. In the state rooms, the berths have been rebuilt, and the lower one in each room is wide enough for a double bed. The saloons and state rooms have been newly gilded, the furniture has been newly upholstered, and the boat has been repainted inside and out. Everything about her is in first class condition. On her trip up, she brought 70 passengers, and a heavy freight.

The Granite State came up on Thursday. She has the same excellent officers as heretofore—Capt. King in command, and Mr. Huntley, clerk.

Miscellaneous

A dark colored man once went to Portland, Me., and attended church. He went into a good pew; when the next neighbor to the man who owned it, said : “What do you put a n****r in your pew for?”  “N****r ! He’s no n****r—he’s a Haytien.”  “Can’t help that; he’s black as the ace of spades.”  “Why, sir, he’s a correspondent of mine.”  “Can’t help that; I tell you, he’s black.”  “But he’s worth a million of dollars.”  “Is he, though?—introduce me!”