From The Constitution, Wednesday, May 4, 1864 (volume 27, number 1375)

War News.

The steamer America, from New Orleans the 19th has arrived. The Era of the 19th contains late news from Bank’s army. An expedition under Gen. Kilby Smith, which with a portion of Admiral Porter’s fleet went up the river previous to the three day’s battles, returned safely on the 13th. The greater portion of the rebel army is at Mansfield and on the river opposite that place. As soon as this expedition arrived at Grand Ecore, preparations at once were made for the advance of the army, and we have good reasons for believing that Gen. Banks is again en route to Shreveport. Hilton Head letters reports a reconnoisance on the 15th, to near Legareville, by a detachment of the 127th New York, accompanied by the gunboat Sonora, which shelled the rebel pickets on James Island. A brief skirmish occurred on the land, but no casualties on our side.

When our men were returning one of them stepped on a torpedo buried in the road, exploding the same and wounding three men.—The ground was then searched and 12 torpedoes destroyed. The Nashville correspondent of the Cincinnati Times of the 26th says: I believe that we are on the eve of great events. Gen. Sherman has reduced the allowance of camp equipage, and has ordered that no officer be allowed more baggage than he can carry himself, thereby saving at least one wagon to a regiment. This, I presume, means a speedy demonstration on the enemy’s works. There are reasons to believe that the forward movement from Chattanooga will commence about the [?]1st of May. At any rate it will be simultaneous with that in Virginia. There are now twenty-five days rations in store at Chattanooga and Knoxville and the amount is augmenting daily, as the cars are enabled to carry at least 15 per cent more than is actually demanded each day, to supply the army. Scattered garrisons in the States are being recalled and all are being sent to the front. Only a few of the more important points will be held by the military.

Advices from Camden, Ark., says that Gen. Steele’s army is there. Gen. Thayer joined Gen. Steele at Elkin’s Ferry, on the Little Missouri river, where the rebels were driven from a line of breastworks commanding the river bottom. The enemy next stood at Prairie de Anna, which was fortified with a line of rifle pits and embankments for the guns in barbette, a mile and a half. Gen. Steele flanked their position and Gen. Price skedaddled, after a brisk fight, toward Washington. Other skirmishes occurred during the march, but our total loss was less than 200. Price supposed Gen. Steele was going to Shreveport via Washington, and moved his command from Camden to Washington after the fight at Prairie de Anna. Gen. Steele pursued the enemy towards Washington, and then suddenly turned and started toward Camden. Price discovered his mistake and started for Camden also. A desperate race ensued, and although heavy skirmishing occurred all the way, Marmaduke being in front and Dockery in the rear, with cavalry and artillery, Steele came out victorious, and entered the enemy’s fortifications unopposed. Camden is strongly fortified. All its approaches are well guarded, and it can be held against a largely superior force. The steamer Yazoo, from New Orleans, on the 21st, arrived at New York, Saturday. A letter dated Alexandria, April 18th, says: “All is quiet at Grand Ecore. The enemy are still around us, and we hope when we are ready for a forward movement again they will not be wanting.” The same letter confirms the death of the rebel Gen. Green in the fight with our gunboat. A cavalry expedition has been sent out on the north bank of the Red river, near Alexandria, by Gen. Grover. A small Union fleet has gone up the Ouachita river. The Red river was slowly falling, but the Mississippi was rising fast, and a rise was expected in consequence, in the Red river. Gen. Weitzel would leave New Orleans on the 23d inst., for a command in Virginia. The steamer Cahawba, from New York, with six hundred troops arrived at New Orleans on the 20th inst. The Merrimac, from Portland, with six hundred troops, arrived there on the 19th inst. The DeMorley, from Portland, with troops, also arrived on the 20th inst.

An expedition, recently sent out by Admiral Lee, has succeeded in destroying large and valuable salt works of the enemy. They also captured 100 conscripts, bringing off 50 in boats.

A powerful squadron is under sailing orders for some point on the Southern coast. A part have already left.

The rebels came out of Charleston harbor on the night of the 18th inst., with one of their cigar shaped torpedo boats, and made an effort to blow up the frigate Wabash. The torpedo was discovered when about three hundred feet distant, and a broadside was fired from the frigate, when she suddenly disappeared.

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The rebel press gloat over the recent successes which they claim to have gained over the Yankees, and are in high glee over the doings of Forrester’s lawless band. The Richmond Examiner says that Forrester, by his butchery of negroes, has “undone in an hour the year’s work of Grant.” The affair in North Carolina is spoken of as showing the “prowess and striking superiority of elan which most signally elevate them above the Yankee soldier.” Gen. Grant may show them a trick worth all of theirs, and compel them to repeat the scenes of November last, at Chattanooga, Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge.

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Pennsylvania is following New York in preparing to let her soldiers vote in the presidential election. A constitutional amendment for the purpose is to be voted on in August, and the legislature will meet in extra session to perfect the details.

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The rebels appear to be looking out for a movement of their valuables southward. The Petersburgh Express says that instructions have been given by the rebel government to the First Auditor of the Treasury to remove his bureau from Richmond to Montgomery, Ala.

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The 12th regiment, C. V., sailed from New Haven Sunday night the 24th, on the transport McClellan, for New York. Upon arriving there, a case of small pox was discovered on board. The sick man was taken off at Blockwell’s Island, and the transport, with the regiment on board, was sent back to New Haven by Gen. Dix, where the regiment went into quarters in the barracks formerly occupied by the 29th C. V.

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The Secretary of the Interior has asked Congress to appropriate $150,000 for the several bands of Chippewas in the Northwest, to aid in removing and establishing them on their own reservation, and to support them in part until the end of the next fiscal year.

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From Europe.—Dates from Liverpool to the 13th are received. Garibaldi had entered London, and had been received with great pomp by both nobility and people. He had been entertained by the Duke of Sutherland, had called on Lord Palmerston, and was soon to dine with him. The conference on the Danish question had not yet met, and the opponents of the government were predicting no favorable results from it. The siege of Duppel was progressing slowly. Several assaults had been made by the Prussians, in which the Danes claim to have repulsed them. The allies assert that some of the Duppel batteries are silent, and that the Danes are preparing to evacuate the intrenchments. Maximilian had received the Mexican deputation at Miramar, and in a speech accepting the Mexican crown expressed his belief that the tender of the scepter of Mexico was by the wish of an overruling majority of its people.

Local News.

New Firm.—Messrs. Levy & Mooney have formed a partnership for the purpose of carrying on the tailoring business. Both gentlemen are well known to the public, and combine among other qualities, energy, experience, good taste and the determination to suit their customers. They have taken the store of A. M. Colgrove, and will soon fill it with a large stock of goods.

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New Soda Fountain.—Chas. E. Putnam has recently put up at his store, 114 Main street, a large and handsome Soda fountain, which he intends to keep in constant operation the coming summer. He also keeps a large stock of fresh confectionary. Ice cream, with fruit in their season will be found at his store.

Give him a call.

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A Dish of Greens.—It seems necessary after a long cold season of a highly stimulating diet that we should go out and gather herbs of the field for our food. Dandelions, with a bitter tonic taste, are the most common article of greens, but the pleasantest vegetable for this way of cooking, and almost a luxury, is spinack. I. Martin has it for sale fresh, and at his store you can find when you are looking for them all the best early fruit and vegetables.

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Various Matters.—A new association, composed of well-known business men has been organized under the name of “Hotchkiss’ Manufacturing Company,” and will soon commence business in the south part of the city.

The “Boston Clothing Store,” 104 Main st., is a place where garments of every style and finish can be obtained at fair prices. …

Kindlings of good quality, low prices, and well seasoned, can be had by leaving orders with Hubbard Bros. They are an excellent substitute for charcoal.

The Meriden Bank has declared a dividend of four per ct., payable May 2d.

Chaffee & Camp have a large assortment of groceries fresh and nice, which they will dispose of at fair prices at No. 138 Main street. Give them a call.

A new article, called the “patent burning fluid,” claiming many advantages over that now in use, can be obtained at E. & F. Chaffee’s. …

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The Weather.—The temperature this week is 2 degrees colder than the week before, being 40 degrees at 6 a.m. A dull north east storm prevailed three days. The spring has been steadily backward. Some trees are not yet leaved out at all. In this region fortunately fruitbuds have not been coaxed forward to their blighting.

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The New York omnibuses have returned to the old rates of fare, the people refusing to pay the increase.

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The Atlantic Cable.—The London Telegraphic Journal indulges in some calculations as to the receipts from the Atlantic cable. It estimates that the cable will transmit 2,592,000 words a year, or 129,600 messages of twenty words each. These messages at £5 each will bring in £648,000, of which £340,000 remain as profit. It is intended that the cable shall be able to carry eight words a minute, though the above calculation allows for only six. The old cable conveyed only two and a half per minute. The Red Sea line is worked at the rate of seven words, and the Malta and Alexandria line at ten words a minute.

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New soda fountain!