From The Constitution, Wednesday, July 6, 1864 (volume 27, number 1384)

War News.

The news from the armies is very meagre. No important operations are reported, either from Virginia or Georgia. Some details of Gen. Wilson’s cavalry expedition are given. It was quite as successful as has been reported. The Danville road was reached, and twenty miles of track, bridges, &c., destroyed. The road was laid with strap rail, and by burning the sleepers the iron was thoroughly destroyed.  Gen. Wilson met with little resistance until he reached the crossing of the Weldon Railroad at Ream’s Station, on his return. Here all the rebel cavalry had concentrated to cut off his retreat, and as he could not pass by them, he engaged them in battle, sending word of his situation in the meantime, to Gen. Meade, who at once dispatched the Sixth Corps to his relief.

In the attempt of Beauregard to retake the position lost on the 15th, the rebel Gen. Elliot was killed.

The latest news from Wilson’s cavalry expedition is exceedingly satisfactory, and puts altogether a new complexion upon the reports which reached us on Saturday night. First of all Gen. Wilson has rejoined the main army around Petersburgh, having got within the Union lines on Friday night. Instead of attempting to force his way through the strong column of rebel infantry posted at Reams’ Station, Gen. Wilson determined to make his way back by a long detour—passing by a point twenty-five miles south of Reams’, where he crossed the Blackwater. The total loss during the entire raid—including the casualties in Kautz’s division—being from 750 to 1,000 men. Sixty miles of railroad were thoroughly destroyed during the expedition—so destroyed that it would take at least forty days to repair them. Wilson brought back with him about 400 negroes and a large number of the horses he had captured.

On the 16th, the rebels opened a heavy fire from their guns on James and Sullivan’s Islands, directing it against Cumming’s Point batteries. No serious damage resulted.

Charlston City is still under the fire of Cumming’s Point, notwithstanding the announcement of Union officers having been placed under fire.

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A Maine regiment en route home from the army of the Potomac, report that they captured recently out of a large rebel force about one hundred, every one of whom was either seventy years old, or thereabout, or boys of fifteen.

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Since the 1st of May, 2558 deaths of soldiers have occurred in the hospitals at Washington.

The Secretary of War has discharged all colored messengers in the War Department, and has ordered the employment of disabled soldiers in their stead.

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The Sanitary Fair at Philadelphia closed last Tuesday, having been opened three weeks. Nearly one million of dollars was obtained. The army sword was voted to Gen. Meade, who had 3,442 votes; Gen. Hancock received 1,506, McClellan 297.

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Resignation of Secretary Chase.—The resignation of Secretary Chase was sent to the Senate on Thursday. The reasons for this act are not known, but it is supposed to be caused by differences with the President.—Wm. Pitt-Fessenden, of Maine, has been appointed to fill the vacancy. He is a man of great intellect and large ability, and having occupied the position of chairman of the finance committee, is well acquainted with the laws that govern that subject.

The Danish Question.

The Danish question, and the prospect of a general war in Europe, is probably before this settled without much aid from the Conference held in London. The strength of Denmark lies in her navy, and the hope of the German Confederation was to despoil her of this, by obtaining the seaport of Kiel which lies in a part of Holstein. The people of North Schleswig protested vehemently against being metamorphosed into Germans, and large meetings were held, at which the territorial division of Schleswig was severely denounced. The Czar of Russia has now come forward and taken the matter in hand. The country in dispute lies in a part of Holstein, while the Emperor as Chief of the family of Holstein Gottorp claims certain “eventual rights,” which rights he has just ceded to his kinsman, the Grand Duke of Oldenburg, at the same time notifying the German Governments that if the protest against the partition of Denmark is disregarded, it will be the duty of Russia to take possession of Kiel and the adjacent countries, in the name of the “rights” transferred to the Grand Duke. This notification has produced a sensation throughout Europe. When Russia speaks of asserting claims, those claims are very likely to be asserted. This new aspect of affairs is auspicious for the ultimate and substantial triumph of Denmark over her aggressive neighbors.

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Promoted.—Wm. J. Broatch of this city is promoted to a captaincy in the 14th Regulars. He first enlisted as a private in the 8th C. V., where through hard service, he won his way to a lieutenancy. While stationed at Fort Trumbull on recruiting service, he resigned his commission, and enlisted in the regular service as a private. He has been rewarded by receiving a captain’s commission.

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Mr. Andrew D. Euson, of Hartford, died on Wednesday of injuries received in the railroad accident at Berlin.

Local News.

Attention ! Draft! –The Board of enrollment at New Haven, gives public notice that any person enrolled may appear before the board and claim to have their names stricken off the list if he can show to the satisfaction of the board that he is not properly enrolled on account of 1st, alienage; 2d, non-residence; 3d, unsuitableness of age; 4th, manifest permanent physical disability, of such degree as to render the person not a proper subject for enrollment under the law and regulations. Civil officers, clergymen and other prominent citizens are invited to appear at all times before the board, to give such information in their possession as may aid in the correction and revision thereof. Sessions of board, for examination of these cases, from 3 to 5, p. m., each day except Saturday.

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Fourth of July.—The fourth in this city passed off very quietly, there being no public celebration during the day. Each one was allowed to celebrate in their own way and “on their own hook.” In the morning at sunrise a salute was fired, the bells rung, and various minor demonstrations were made with swivels and small guns to remind one that the 4th of July, 1864, had begun. Most of the stores with the banks and public offices were closed during the day, and business generally suspended. The steamer Charles Benton left the wharf at eight o’clock, with a large party on board, for an excursion to New London, returning in the evening. As to the weather, no better could have been desired; the air clear and bracing, neither too warm or cold, and every one appearing in good spirits, added a charm to the occasion. At sunset a salute was fired, the bells run, and the citizens soon began to assemble in crowds on Main street, to witness the exhibition of fireworks under the management of Messrs. J. C. Ferree and Charles E. Putnam, aided by the liberality of our citizens. The exhibition lasted until nearly ten, when the crowd went home well satisfied. No accident, of a serious nature, has come to our knowledge, as happening during the day.

A general display of the stars and stripes throughout the city, and streamers from the vessels in the river was made during the day. From the Cartridge Factory of D. C. Sage at Fort Hill, a flagstaff had been erected, and the flag given to the breeze early in the day.

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Seizure.—The propeller, Charles Benton, on its excursion to New London on Monday, was boarded by the revenue officers of that port, who after a short examination allowed the vessel to proceed to the dock. In about half an hour, however, an officer came on board, and took possession of the vessel. The reason given was, that the boat had no papers allowing her to carry passengers. She was released after a detention of an hour or two, upon bonds being given. There was no little feeling expressed by the excursionists against the person who informed the government officers, in order to pocket the $50 reward.

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Afflictive Death.—Mr. Isaac Hentze, of Illinois, while on a visit to his brother in this town, Maromas, died on Wednesday under the following circumstances. Before leaving home, he had assisted in skinning a cow, which he learned afterwards had been bitten by a mad dog. After arriving here he complained of being unwell, and of severe pain in the throat and body, which increased at intervals. He exhibited every symptom of hydrophobia, and expired in great agony on the 29th ult.

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Rebuilding.—Workmen have commenced to clear away the rubbish at the Starr factory in Staddle Hill, which was burnt a few years since. The property has recently changed hands, and we understand that a large factory will soon be erected.

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Justices of the peace must see to it that the certificates of their oath of office have a 5 cent government stamp on them, properly cancelled, or the Clerk of the Courts cannot receive them.

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Commencement Exercises.—Sunday morning, Baccalaureate Sermon by Rev. J. Cummings.

Sunday evening, Address before the Missionary Lyceum by Rev. R. L. Dashiell.

Monday evening, before the United Literary Societies, a Poem, by W. S. Studley.

Tuesday evening, Address before the Phi Beta Kappa Society, by George Thompson, Esq., the English Orator.

Wednesday evening, Concert by the Mendelssohn Quintette Club, of Boston.

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Concert.—Mendelssohn Quintette Club.—The Middletown public have again an opportunity afforded them, by the efforts and under the auspices of the graduating class of Wesleyan University, to listen to the soft notes and delicious strains of music produced by the Mendelssohn Quintette Club of Boston, which has no superior in this country. It has for many years taken the lead of all other associations of this kind, and its services are constantly in dement at a high price. On one or two former occasions it has visited this city, and met with genuine success. The concert given here two years since to a crowded house, will be remembered by many with pleasure. They will appear again on Wednesday evening, the 20th inst., at the M. E. Church in this city. Tickets 50 cents.

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The bark, Monticello sailed from New London last Tuesday, for the Artic regions, taking out Mr. Hall and his two Esquimaux friends. Mr. Hall expects to be absent about two years, and is in hopes of learning more about Sir John Franklin’s expedition.

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‘You want a flogging, that’s what you do,’ said a parent to an unruly son. ‘I know it dad; but I’ll try to get along without it,’ was the reply.

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Performances 1864