From The Constitution, Wednesday, November 9, 1864 (volume 27, number 1402)

War News.

The destruction of the rebel ram Albemarle by Lieut. Cushing, proves to be one of the most daring and romantic naval feats of history.

A fight (locality not stated) is reported to have occurred recently between a portion of Forrest’s command and the Union force under Cols. Hatch and Shelley, in which the rebels were routed with the loss of their arms, ammunition and baggage. Strong reinforcements have arrived at Paducah, which, it is believed, has induced Forrest to change his plan of operations. It is not believed that he will make an attack on Johnsonville.

The Tallahassee is at her old tricks again. She has captured and destroyed the schooner Goodspeed, of Boston, seven miles south of Block Island, and her crew boasted that they had already destroyed three other vessels. The gunboat Marblehead left Newport last evening in pursuit of [the pirate].

The Secretary of War has sent a dispatch to the Mayor of Buffalo, conveying the information that intelligence has been received from the British Provinces of a rebel conspiracy to burn the Northern cities on the day of the Presidential election. Active measure are in progress to thwart the execution of this design.

A dispatch received at headquarters in Nashville on Friday, from Decatur, says: “The enemy, under cover of darkness last night, with a heavy column, drove in our pickets, and established a line of riflepits five hundred yards from our front. An hour since we drove them out of their pits with a much inferior force, captured one hundred and twenty men, killed and wounded a great number. They belonged to Cheatham’s division.

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Maryland Free.—On Tuesday last, Maryland became a free State. The flags in this city, on that day were thrown to the breeze in honor of the occasion.

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VOTE EARLY—the polls will be open at 9 o’clock.

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VOTE EARLY.

Voters, make no business engagements that shall prevent you from devoting the whole of Tuesday, if necessary to the preeminent duty of getting Union men to the polls. Get the Union vote early, for a full and early vote will indicate a Union victory!

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A Question to be Answered.

If McClellan is the great General represented, why are the peace howlers so enthusiastic for him?

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The Issues.

Never in any presidential campaign have the issues been so clear as in the present. Never has it been more easy to draw the dividing line. All the arguments may be stated as follows: For Disunion, vote for George B. McClellan. For Union and Liberty, vote for Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson.

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WILL THEY DO IT?

Slavery challenged the United States of America to mortal combat. In the deadly struggle it has been impaled upon the bayonets of the Union armies, and writhes and struggles in its last death throes. The copperheads put on crape and mourn in deep sorrow for their old ally, and cry out, Stop the war! stop it!! stop it!!! Whether we shall accede to their demand or not, is to be decided on Tuesday. Freemen, are you ready to answer?

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WHAT ANDREW JOHNSON SAYS.

In a recent speech Andrew Johnson stated the issue to be:–“Shall the institution of slavery control the Government of the United States, or shall the Government control it? Shall the Government control its institutions, or shall they control it?” There it is in a few plain words. As regards compromises he said: “all the talk of them and their Northern coadjutors, then and since, about compromise, has been sheer hypocrisy—a mere pretence to delude the people.

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THE DIFFERENCE.

Union Doctrine.—“If any man hauls down the American flag, shoot him on the spot.”

Copperhead Doctrine.—“If any man hauls down the American flag, exhaust all the resources to induce him to put it up again, but dont shoot.”

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A VOTE FOR LINCOLN

Will be a declaration that the rebellion must be put down, and the unity of the republic preserved; a vote for McClellan will mean disintegration, and interminable wars.

A VOTE FOR LINCOLN

Will be a vote to keep able and successful leaders at the head of our armies; a vote for McClellan will be a vote to reinstate the cast-off generals who have been weighed in the balance and found wanting.

A VOTE FOR LINCOLN

Will be a vote for law, order and permanent institutions; a vote for McClellan will be a vote for anarchy, confusion, slavery and interminable wars.

A VOTE FOR LINCOLN

Will put the seal of national endorsement upon the gallant deeds of Grant, Sherman and Sheridan; a vote for McClellan will reiterate the slander of the Chicago platform that the war for the Union is a “failure.”

A VOTE FOR LINCOLN

Will be a vote in favor of the government and of the rights guaranteed by the Constitution; a vote for McClellan will be to declare for the rebellion and to endanger our liberties forever.

A VOTE FOR LINCOLN

Will be a vote to insure the permanent purity of the ballot box and to secure the right of the majority to govern; a vote for McClellan will be a vote to bring men into power who forge the names of dead soldiers to defraud the people.

A VOTE FOR LINCOLN

Will carry joy to loyal homes and to the friends of humanity everywhere; a vote for McClellan will carry sorrow to the loyal and prolongation of misery to the slave.

A VOTE FOR LINCOLN

Will be a vote for the speedy suppression of the rebellion, the return of peace, and an indefinite career of national unity and happiness; a vote for McClellan will be a vote in favor of an armistice, the resuscitation of rebel strength, and a renewal of the contest when the country is least inclined to resume the work.

VOTE FOR LINCOLN AND JOHNSON

If you wish happiness, peace and prosperity, once more.

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THE CANVASS ENDED

The Presidential Canvass for 1864 has now about closed. After nine weeks of discussion of the platforms and candidates, it is expected that every voter, who reasons at all, has made up his mind for whom he will cast his vote. There probably has never been a time when the issues have been more plain or the dividing line between the two parties more distinct than the one which we have passed through. The reasons for this are obvious. Abraham Lincoln has been at the head of the government during one of its greatest struggles for national life. His course of action has been thoroughly watched and criticized, and the people well know to what end he is aiming—that of preserving the national government entire, without the loss of one state. The objects of his opponents are also well understood. Their aim is Disunion, secession and anarchy. This is the question to be decided. National Unity, or Disunion! For the result the Union men have no fears. In spite of the diabolical fraud on the votes of the soldiers who are fighting for their country; the threats of assassination, robbery and pillage of our cities; they have confidence of an overwhelming majority in favor of their cause, and the suppression of traitors throughout the land. To secure this majority it is necessary that every Union man vote on Tuesday, the 8th inst.

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LOOK OUT FOR THEM!

The copperheads will invent all sorts of rebel schemes to prevent a full vote for Lincoln and Johnson. They will “bull” gold in the New York market. They will start reports of military disasters. They have been busily engaged in the attempt to prove that nothing has been accomplished during the war. And in all this, Jeff. Davis and his emissaries give their assistance. Unionists! we have but one duty in these circumstances. It is to go straight forward, incited to new activity by the machinations of copperheads and of rebels and secure such a majority for Lincoln as shall stagger them.

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RALLY ONCE MORE!

The Union Men are requested to meet at Eagle Hall this Monday evening. Speeches will be made by Hon. John M. Douglas and others. Rally once more.

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The Young Men’s Wide Awake Club of this city, paraded our streets last Saturday evening, with torches and banners. They numbered nearly 200, and made a fine appearance. After the parade they adj. to Eagle Hall, where a collation had been prepared for them by the ladies.

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Messrs. Editors:

I was much surprised last evening to hear Mr. Culver give as a reason for his abandonment of the Union party that the administration had adopted the emancipation policy. Mr. Culver and myself addressed a war meeting at Deep River in October, 1861. He there took strong grounds in favor of crushing out this rebellion by force of arms, and was in favor of using all means necessary to that end. He spoke particularly in favor of confiscating the property of rebels and freeing the negroes, arguing very conclusively that under the war power the President had a right to do this, and blaming him for not exercising that power. He closed this part of his speech as near as I can recollect by declaring that “rebels had no rights which the government were bound to respect except the right to be hung up by the neck until they were dead.”  Middletown, Nov. 4, 1864.

A. B. Calef.

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Isaac Toucey, Buchanan’s Secretary of the Navy, who scattered our ships just before the rebellion, is emerging from the obscurity in which he has been glad to conceal himself from the contempt of an outraged people, in order to say a word for McClellan, Pendleton, and the Chicago platform.

It is natural that he, who disarmed the nation that the blows of the rebels might tell, four years ago, should now advocate the platform which his rebel friends made at Niagara. It is appropriate that he should support the party which declares the war a failure and asks for a cessation of hostilities. It is consistent that he should now come to the help of Jeff Davis, whom he encouraged to rush into the trouble in which the rebel President now finds himself. But what say the people of Connecticut and Rhode Island to candidates whom Isaac Toucey wants?—Prov. Jour.

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Item.—Toucey spoke to the unterrified at Touro Hall last evening. From what we heard of his remarks, we judge he doesn’t approve of the emancipation proclamation or the confiscation bill, and will not vote for Abraham Lincoln on Tuesday next.—Fortunately his vote is not needed to elect Mr. Lincoln.—Courant.

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The soldier who, when asked if he was going to vote the democratic ticket, replied, “Why, I’ve been shooting democrats for the last three years,” exactly hit the mark. This democratic party which is in rebellion it is now proposed to restore to power, by elevation of a man to the Presidency who was restrained by a fellow feeling from making vigorous war on the “democrats” when he was in command. The friends of the democrats our boys shoot at, we don’t vote for.

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Commerce 1864