From The Constitution, Wednesday, January 11, 1865 (volume 28, number 1411)

War News.

Hood made his final escape across the Tennessee, at Bainbridge, on the 24th ult. Gen. Thomas is now complete master of the situation. It is believed Hood will retire upon Meridian, Miss., to reorganize his army. In the meantime Thomas is on the alert, and already in motion for a resumption of the campaign from a new point, the direction of which will shortly appear.

A special dispatch from Cairo states that Gen. Dana’s raid on the Mobile and Ohio Railroad was completely successful. Twenty-five bridges were burned, four thousand carbines, a large amount of ammunition, and three hundred army wagons were captured. Many officers and men were taken prisoners, and thirty-two rail cars were destroyed.

It appears that the destruction of the Gulf railroad by Sherman struck a staggering blow to Lee and Davis at Richmond. The Evening Post has a private letter from a citizen of Savannah, which states, on the authority of an officer of that road, that it supplied Lee’s army up to the time it was broken, with 11,500 head of cattle per week, the cattle coming from Floring and Southern Alabama. Indeed six weeks before Sherman left Atlanta, Lee wrote to the president of the road that its facilities must be enlarged, or he would be obliged to fall back with his army from Virginia nearer his base of supplies. There was reason to believe, from information furnished by the residents of Savannah, that Lee had not thirty days supply of provisions on hand.

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The Indians in Minnesota have come to sue for peace, and have given up Mrs. Kelly who was taken by them in Minnesota in 1862, at the time of the massacre, and whose fate has excited so much interest in the country.

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The debate on the Constitutional amendment, prohibiting slavery in the several States of the Union, began in Congress Friday morning. Its friends have hopes of the success of the measure.

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For Our Soldiers.—An effort is being made throughout the country to supply our soldiers with libraries and a request has been made that every friend of the soldiers should purchase a book, with his or her name in it, and leave it with the bookseller, with instructions to hand it over to the U. S. Christian Commission, which engages to send all books thus donated. 300,000 are called for. Will not the citizens of this vicinity lend their aid in this worthy object.

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Forty-three arrests for murder were made in New York last year. During the same time five policemen were killed and thirteen were seriously injured.

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Notes from Rebeldom.

Much has been said during the war of the “ditch” into which the rebels were to resort at the “last” extremity. By perusing an article in the Richmond Sentinel of recent date, it seems the “ditch” is found, and that the southern people are about to receive the requisite amount of embalming to enable them to remain in that ditch without trouble from a wounded conscience. It has been intimated in high circles that this article is from the of the rebel chief, embracing his views and plans. At least so much importance is attached to it as truly representing the condition of the South, that Secretary Seward has ordered copies of it to be sent to our foreign ministers, to show them that by the admission of the rebels themselves the Confederacy is a failure and they should not be recognized as belligerents. The article commences by saying that “it is childish to whine under misfortune, cowardly to sink under it, and absurd to be enfeebled by it.” It says that “the late reverses have done much towards preparing the minds of the people for the most extreme sacrifices if they shall be adjudged necessary.” It says that “troublesome times are upon them,” and that so long as they have a man or a dollar they must be used. The last clause has been proclaimed so often that it will neither excite fear or raise their sinking funds. But the ditch into which they are to plunge at last may be found in the following sentence: “If adverse gales and devouring billows should constrain our storm-lost ship into some port, let it be no Yankee port. If an unpropitious Providence should condemn us to a master, let it not be a Yankee master. Any terms with any other would be preferable to subjugation to them.” This it declares to be the sentiment of the people. Instead of coming again under the protection of the old flag, which has been and still is the emblem of protection and civilization wherever unfurled, they are willing to submit to degradation of the lowest form, and bow the knee forever to any foreign power who will aid them. To such a depth of degradation have the rebel chiefs arrived. Thus are the fruits of secession and rebellion, sown in prosperous pride and arrogance, now reaped in humiliation and sorrow. But can the people of the South be brought to concur in such a proposal? Have they not seen enough of the horrors of war, with its devastation and sacrifice, to make them wish for the return of the times, when plenty and happiness abounded, and the country felt strong in its power to keep foreign nations from obtaining a foothold on our territory? If the recent Union sentiment at Savannah may be taken as a fair sample of the feeling among the intelligent men at the South, such submission will never take place. The leaders of the rebellion will soon be shown that they have arrived at the brink of the “last ditch,” and unless they remain quiet, will be made to walk over. Then what patriotic soul will not rejoice, to have the laws of our common country honored and respected, from Maine to Louisiana, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, by a happy, prosperous, and united people.

Local News.

City Election.

The election of City Officers takes place on Monday. The affairs of the City have for the last few years been in the hands of Union men, and it is most becoming that they should so continue. The opposition are secretly at work, and intimate that they will have a change this month. It lays wholly with the Union men whether this will be done, as they have the controlling vote. It will need the presence of every Union man at the polls on MONDAY NEXT, early as midday, the polls closing at 2 o’clock. Attend the caucus at Eagle Hall on Friday evening, and then elect the men nominated. Win honor and victory at home while our brave boys are doing as much in the field. The polls close at 2 p. m. VOTE EARLY.

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Business Changes.—Mr. H. S. White will soon erect a brick building on the corner of Hamlin and Church streets for manufacturing purposes. Messrs. G. T. & C. C. Hubbard, of the firm of Hubbard Bros., have purchased the property in the south part of the city, known as the poor house property, where improvements are being made for the manufacture of edge tools; the close proximity of the stone palace, it is supposed, will have no effect on the business talents of the enterprising gentlemen: No change will be made in the firm of Hubbard Bros. The south store in Eagle Hall block is being re-fitted and will soon be occupied by the officers of the First National Bank in this city.

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A dining saloon, where meals of every variety and style are furnished, has been opened at No. 62 Court street, under McDonough Hall. Persons visiting the city, will please make a note of it.

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Have you ever voted within the last three years, a ticket headed “democratic?” If so, the opportunity is once more offered to cancel the act, by voting the Union Ticket for city officers next Monday. Polls close at 2 o’clock.

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A.J. Spencer will give a “hop” at McDonough Hall, Wednesday evening of this week. Thus far they have been well attended, and offered much enjoyment.

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Preparations are now being made for filling the ice house at Pameacha pond. It has been usual to make several preparations, before the “clerk of the weather” allows the operation to be completed. If ice is cold, it will burn into a pile of greenbacks, as quick as many other things, and needs no hindrances in gathering it.

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Two burglars have been convicted in London, and sent to six months’ imprisonment each, on the indirect testimony of a parrot, who told its mistress that one of the prisoners came into the room and stole the money.

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The Prince of Wales’ yearly allowance is to be fixed at £50,000. In our currency this would be something like $600,000, on which the young man ought to support his wife and baby.

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The highest legal tribunal of Scotland, not long since decided that, according to the Scotch law of marriage, consent is the essence of the contract, and is sufficient to constitute marriage without any ceremony or publication, or even the parties living together; that if the parties seriously and actually consent to be man and wife from that time forth they are man and wife in Scotland.

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